Bibliography Web Images

Citing  Digital  Images  from  Web  pages

Locate the following information:

1.  The nameof the photographer or person who created the image, if known. 

2.  The Title (or caption) of the image --Italicized.  If you are using the caption and it's very long, you can just include the beginning words of it.  If no title or caption is given, give a short description of the work and do not italicize it.  Write Digital Image after the title/caption.*

3.  Title of Website - Website where the image was found.  Italicized.

4. The publisher of the Website - This is the name of the organization responsible for the website, followed by a comma.  (Publisher's name is usually at the bottom of the home webpage.)  If no publisher is given, use n.p. ("no publisher")

5. The date that the source was electronically published.--or  the last update or revision date, written in MLA format (day-month-year).  If no date is given, us n.d. ("no date").

6.  Medium of publication (Web).

7.  Date of access written in MLA format (day-month-year).

8.  URL (Uniform Resource Locator) - Write in angel brackets, with a period at the end.  To avoid long URLs use the URL for the main page of the website.

Example

An online photo where the photographer's name is unknown.  The title is taken from the caption, so it is italicized.



Galactic Collision.  Digital image.  It's the end of the Galaxy as 
        We Know It.  UC San Diego, n.d.   Web  15 Dec 2012
                                                                   <http://www.sdsc.edu/pub/envision/v16.1/hernquist.html



Example

An online photo when neither the title or caption is given.  A short description, not in italics, is used instead.




Kailua Beach.  Digital image.  Auntie Barbara's Vacation Rentals,
        Kailus Oahu.  Auntie Barbara's Vacation Rentals, n.d.  Web 
                                                                           7 Jan 2011   <http://www.hawaiibjvacations.com>



Citing  Known  Artwork,  Paintings  or  Photography,  Posted Online

Include all the information you would list for digital images.  Then include the following:

1. The year the artwork was created, if known.

2. The name and location of the museum or institution where the artwork is held, if known.

3.  Do not include the description, Digital Image.

Example

The original painting is owned by the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D. C.  The image of the painting was accessed through ibiblio.org; The Public's Library and Digital Archive.


Rembrandt.  The Mill.  1650.  National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.  Web 
     19 Sept. 2002.  Web. 21 Dec. 2010  
      <http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/rembrandt/1650/>


Citing  Images  from  Online  Library  Subscription  Databases

Many subscription databases will provide the correct citation for an image.  When the citation is provided:

1. Cut and paste it into your Bibliography or Works Cited List.  The first word of the citation is used to put the citation in alphabetical order in your Bibliography or Works Cited List

2.  Italicize the title if it is in quotation marks.  Delete the quotation marks in the title, if they are there.

3.  Add the word Image after the title/caption if it is not included in the database citation.

When the Citation is not provided:

1.  List the title or caption of the picture in italics followed by the word Image

2.  Use one of the citation makers with the appropriate information to create the rest of the citation and copy and paste it into your Bibliography or Works Cited List.

Example

From the Gale Databases.  The title was changed to being italicized instead of being in quotation marks and the word Image was added.








Salon Du Chocolat In Paris. Image.  UPI Photo Collection. 
       United Press International, 2010. Culinary Arts Collection.
       Web. 1 May 2012.



How  to  Cite  Images  from  the  Internet

It is important to give credit to the person or organization who is responsible for any image you use from the internet.  It is considered plagiarism if you don't.

Just think about it.  How would you like it if someone use a photograph, drawing, painting, comic, or any other image you created and posted on the internet, then claimed it was theirs.  

Even if you cannot find out who the person was that created the image, you must cite the website from where you retrieved the image.

        How to Find the Information for an Image on the Internet from a Web Page

1.  When you find an image on a web page that you want to use, look around the image to see if there is a name for the artist or photographer  If one is used, write their name. 

2.  Check to see of the image has a title.  If it has a title, write it down.

3.  Locate the name of the webpage by looking at the banner at the top of the web page and write it down.

4.  Locate the name of the organization that is publishing the image.  This is located at the bottom of the web page.  Look for the copyright symbol.  The name of the organization is usually next to it. Write it down.

5.  Locate either the copyright date or date last updated.

6.  Write down the date you are downloading the image. 

You will use this information to create your citation.


      ********Special Note About Using Images Found Through Google Images*********


If you are using an image of any kind from Google Images, you must find the information for that image from the original webpage!!!!!


      *******How To Get The Information For an Image Found on Google Images*******

1.  When you find an image on Google, click once on that image. 

2.   A new window will open.  The image will appear with a column next to it.  At the top of the column is a link titled "Website for this Image". 

3.  Click on that link and it will take you to the website of that image. 

4.   Once you are on that website, follow the directions above for finding information about an image on a website.

Once you have collected the information for your image, whether from Google or through a regular search you are ready to create your citations.

Here are the guidelines from the the MLA Handbook, 7th edition as explained by the M. Kemble, MPI Library, Mid Pacific Institute of Honolulu, Hawaii.

Digital images are pictures that can be viewed electronically by a computer or digital device. They can include photographs, illustrations, or graphics found on a website, database, or scanned or saved to your computer.

How to cite a digital image found on a website in MLA 8:

To create a citation for a digital image found on a website in MLA 8, locate the following pieces of information:

The name of the creator of the digital image
*The title of the digital image
The title of the website that the image was found on
The names of any other contributors responsible for the digital image
Version of the image (if applicable)
Any numbers associated with the image (if applicable)
*The publisher of the image
The date the image was created or published
*The location of the image, such as a URL

*Notes:
If the digital image does not have a title, include a description of the image. Do not place this information in quotation marks or italics.

If the picture was found using Google Images, do not cite Google Images as the publisher. Instead, click on the picture and use the information from the website that is hosting the picture.

When including the URL in the citation, omit “http://” and “https://” from the site’s address. In addition, if the citation will be viewed on a digital device, it is helpful to make it clickable. This ensures that readers will be able to easily access and view the source themselves.

Structure of a citation for an image found on a website in MLA 8:

Creator’s Last name, First name. “Title of the digital image.” Title of the website, First name Last name of any contributors, Version (if applicable), Number (if applicable), Publisher, Publication date, URL.

Examples of citations for digital images found on websites in MLA 8:

Vasquez, Gary A. Photograph of Coach K with Team USA. NBC Olympics, USA Today Sports, 5 Aug. 2016, www.nbcolympics.com/news/rio-olympics-coach-ks-toughest-test-or-lasting-legacy.

Gilpin, Laura. “Terraced Houses, Acoma Pueblo, New Mexico.” Library of Congress, Reproduction no. LC-USZ62-102170, 1939, www.loc.gov/pictures/item/90716883/.

How to cite a digital image found on a database in MLA 8:

Many digital images can be found on databases. Perhaps you found an image that is in a journal article on a database. It is important to include not only the name of the journal, but also the name of the database. This will allow readers to locate and view the digital image themselves.

To create a citation for a digital image found on a database in MLA 8, locate the following pieces of information:

The name of the creator of the digital image
*The title of the digital image
The title of the journal and/or container that the image was found on
The names of any other contributors responsible for the digital image
Version of the image (if applicable)
Any numbers associated with the image (if applicable)
*The publisher of the image
The date the image was created or published
The name of the database or second container that the image was found on
*The location of the image, such as a URL or DOI number

*Notes:
If the digital image does not have a title, include a description of the image. Do not place this information in quotation marks or italics.

When including the URL in the citation, omit “http://” and “https://” from the site’s address. In addition, if the citation will be viewed on a digital device, it is helpful to make it clickable. This ensures that readers will be able to easily access and view the source themselves.

Structure of a citation for a digital image found on a database in MLA 8:

Creator’s last name, first name. “Title of the image.” Title of the journal or container that the image was found on, First name Last name of any other contributors responsible for the image, Version of the image (if applicable), Any numbers associated with the image (such as a volume and issue number, if applicable), Publisher, Publication date, Location. Title of the database or second container, URL or DOI number.

Example of a citation for a digital image found on a database in MLA 8:

Huanca Barrantes, Angela. “Questions and statements posted on the wall are reminders for Ms. Huanca’s students.” English Teaching Forum, U.S. Department of State, vol. 53, no. 2, 2015, p. 41. ERIC, eric.ed.gov/?q=english+teaching+forum&id=EJ1065702.

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