Keyboard Function Key Assignment Sheet

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Is there a function key on your Mac you never use? Here’s how to make it do something else.

Do you ever use Launchpad? Me neither, so I think dedicating a physical key on the keyboard to it is pointless – but I do check my calendar a lot. I remapped the Launchpad key (which kind of looks like a calendar anyway!) to launch Itsycal, the tiny keyboard friendly calendarItsycal: Tiny Keyboard-Friendly Calendar For Your Menu Bar [Mac]Itsycal: Tiny Keyboard-Friendly Calendar For Your Menu Bar [Mac]Read More. Now I can press that button to quickly check my appointments.

You might want to re-map some other key, for some other purpose. What about the Mission Control key, or the keyboard brightness ones? If there’s a key you never use, here’s how to make it do something else.

Step One: Take Back Your Function Keys

Once upon a time, the top row of keys on every Mac were simply labeled: F1, F2, and so on. Many programs used these for keyboard shortcuts, but in the late 90’s Apple started assinging them to specific functions – things like showing you all of your windows, or changing the volume. Eventually they added icons to the keys themselves, showing you what function they’re for, and making it harder to assign them to functions yourself. The old-fashioned F-number labels remain, but you can only trigger the old-fashioned F-number keystroke by holding Fn while hitting the respective key.

Confused? All you really need to know is that these keys are locked to serve one function by OS X, but you can unlock them to work more like regular keystrokes. Think of this as “flipping” their default function. There are two main ways to do this:

  1. Using the Keyboard pane in System Preferences. No software is needed, but it’s an all-or-nothing approach.
  2. Using a free app called Karabiner. You’ll need to installing another program, but you can toggle some keys to switch while keeping others normal.

Which approach you use is up to you – personally I use Karabiner. You could also look into FunctionFlip, which in theory is a simple way of flipping your function keysSwitch Your Mac Function Keys with FunctionFlip [Mac]Switch Your Mac Function Keys with FunctionFlip [Mac]Read More, but I had trouble getting it to work with El Capitan.

For the first option, simply open System Preferences, then head to the Keyboard section. On the first tab, called Keyboard, you’ll see the option to “Use all F1, F2, etc. keys as standard function keys”.

Press this button and the all of keys will, by default, work as function keys. Go ahead and press them: a lot of them won’t do anything. Some will continue to work as before, but we’ll get to that later.

If you’d prefer to switch up some function keys but not others, download Karabiner (previously called KeyRemap4MacBokReconfigure Your Mac Keyboard for More Geek Power [Mac]Reconfigure Your Mac Keyboard for More Geek Power [Mac]If you're the type of Mac user who likes to customize every feature or program on your computer, you might want to check out the system preferences application, KeyRemap4MacBook. It essentially enables you to re-map...Read More). Install it (it’s free) and fire it up. This can feel a little intimidating, but don’t worry: just scroll until you see Change to F1..F19 Key:

Expand that option, then expand Fuctional Keys to F1..F12, as seen above. You can now check any category of keys to make them work, by default, like F-number keys instead of keys with a specific function.

Step Two: Changing The Keyboard Shortcuts

Now that you’ve change what pressing your key does,

There are two places to do this:

  1. For system-wide keyboard shortcuts, check the Keyboard pane in System Preferences.
  2. For keyboard shortcuts related to a specific application, check the Preferences pane for that application.
  3. If neither of the above approaches work, try installing BetterTouchTool.

Whatever your approach, I think we should first open up System Preferences, then head to Keyboard, before finally hitting the Shortcuts tab:

As you can see, many of the F-number keys may be set to trigger shortcuts regardless of whether you’ve “flipped” them or not. Be sure to disable any shortcuts mapped to an F-number key. Then explore any functions you actually want triggered by your keys.

On to the section option: configuring keys to work with specific programs. Remember when I mentioned bringing up a mini calendar whenever I press what once was the LaunchPad button?

Doing this was straight-forward: I just went to the program’s options page, then set F4 to be the application’s keyboard shortcut.

Finally, if there’s some function of your Mac you can’t find using either of these approaches, I recommend installing BetterTouchTool.

This program lets you set custom keyboard shortcuts to do just about anything, including triggering other keyboard shortcuts, so dive in!

Things You Could Create Keys For

So, what could you use your unused keys for? Here’s a few ideas.

An Emoji Key. OS X comes with an emoji toolSecrets of OS X Mavericks: What You Really Need To KnowSecrets of OS X Mavericks: What You Really Need To KnowYou probably already know about the major features of the latest, free upgrade for Mac OS X. Here are the hidden ones.Read More, but the keyboard shortcut (control+command+space) is kind of hard to remember. You can use BetterTouchTool to trigger the more complex keyboard shortcut every time you hit one of your F-number keys, for faster emoji enjoyment.

A calendar key, as I explained above. Personally I use Itsycal, but you could assign this to Fantastical or even Apple’s default Calendar app.

Launch the notification center. The old-school Dashboard had its own key on older Macs, but notifications widgets have replaced the DashboardThese Notification Centre Widgets Make Dashboard IrrelevantThese Notification Centre Widgets Make Dashboard IrrelevantThe Dashboard is dying. Most users ignore it, and not many developers are building things for it. Replace all of your Mac's Dashboard widgets using the new Today view in Yosemite.Read More. There’s no key to open the Notification Center, though, so why not create one yourself?

A weather key. There are a lot of great Mac weather apps6 Wonderful Weather Apps For Mac, Most Of Them Free6 Wonderful Weather Apps For Mac, Most Of Them FreeThere are many ways to find the weather forecast on your Mac, but nothing beats a dedicated app. Here are six of the best.Read More out there, including at least one snarky personal weather robotCARROT is Your Snarky Personal Weather Robot for Mac & iPhoneCARROT is Your Snarky Personal Weather Robot for Mac & iPhoneA sarcastic robot, with little regard for humanity, working as your personal weather forecaster? That's interesting.Read More. If you look at forecasts often, why not re-map one of your keys to open your favorite forecast?

I could go on: you could launch automator scripts with your F-keysHow To Use Your F-Keys For Launching Apps & Finder Items [Mac]How To Use Your F-Keys For Launching Apps & Finder Items [Mac]The F-keys on your Mac keyboard can be a powerful set of application and Finder item launchers, saving you the trouble of burrowing through the Finder and bookmarks to launch say iCal, Address Book, your...Read More, for example.

Which keys do you feel like replacing, and what will you program them to do? Let’s talk about this in the comments below.

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This article describes keyboard shortcuts, function keys, and some other common shortcut keys for Excel 2016. This includes the access keys that you can use for ribbon commands. For Excel Online, see Keyboard shortcuts in Excel Online.

Notes:

  • To keep this reference available when you work, you may want to print this topic. To print this topic, press Ctrl+P.

  • Get these keyboard shortcuts in a Word document at this link: Excel 2016 for Windows keyboard shortcuts

Frequently used shortcuts

If you're new to the Ribbon, the information in this section can help you understand the Ribbon's keyboard shortcut model. The Ribbon comes with new shortcuts, called Key Tips, which you can make appear when you press the Alt key. The Ribbon groups related commands on tabs. For example, on the Home tab, the Number group includes the Number Format command.

This table lists the most frequently used shortcuts in Excel 2016.

To do this

Press

Close a workbook

Ctrl+W

Open a workbook

Ctrl+O

Go to the Home tab

Alt+H

Save a workbook

Ctrl+S

Copy

Ctrl+C

Paste

Ctrl+V

Undo

Ctrl+Z

Remove cell contents

Delete key

Choose a fill color

Alt+H, H

Cut

Ctrl+X

Go to Insert tab

Alt+N

Bold

Ctrl+B

Center align cell contents

Alt+H, A, then C

Go to Page Layout tab

Alt+P

Go to Data tab

Alt+A

Go to View tab

Alt+W

Open context menu

Shift+F10, or

Context key

Add borders

Alt+H, B

Delete column

Alt+H,D, then C

Go to Formula tab

Alt+M

Hide the selected rows

Ctrl+9

Hide the selected columns

Ctrl+0

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Ribbon keyboard shortcuts

If you're new to the ribbon, the information in this section can help you understand the ribbon's keyboard shortcut model.

When you press the Alt key, letters appear in small images, called KeyTips, next to tabs and commands on the ribbon, as shown in the following image.

You can combine these letters with Alt to make shortcuts called Access Keys for ribbon commands. For example, Alt+H opens the Home tab, and Alt+Q goes to the Tell me box.

Press Alt again to see KeyTips for the commands on any tab.

Access keys for ribbon tabs

To go directly to a tab on the ribbon, press one of the following access keys:

To do this

Press

Open the Tell me box on the Ribbon and type a search term for assistance or Help content.

Alt+Q, and then enter the search term.

Open the File page and use Backstage view.

Alt+F

Open the Home tab and format text and numbers and use the Find tool.

Alt+H

Open the Insert tab and insert PivotTables, charts, add-ins, Sparklines, pictures, shapes, headers, or text boxes.

Alt+N

Open the Page Layout tab and work with themes, page setup, scale, and alignment.

Alt+P

Open the Formulas tab and insert, trace, and customize functions and calculations.

Alt+M

Open the Data tab and connect to, sort, filter, analyze, and work with data.

Alt+A

Open the Review tab and check spelling, add comments, and protect sheets and workbooks.

Alt+R

Open the View tab and preview page breaks and layouts, show and hide gridlines and headings, set zoom magnification, manage windows and panes, and view macros.

Alt+W

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Work in the ribbon with the keyboard

To do this

Press

Select the active tab of the ribbon, and activate the access keys.

Alt or F10. To move to a different tab, use access keys or the arrow keys.

Move the focus to commands on the ribbon.

Tab or Shift+Tab

Move down, up, left, or right, respectively, among the items on the Ribbon.

The Down Arrow, Up Arrow, Left Arrow, or Right Arrow key

Activate a selected button.

Spacebar or Enter

Open the list for a selected command.

The Down Arrow key

Open the menu for a selected button.

Alt+Down Arrow

When a menu or submenu is open, move to the next command.

Down Arrow key

Expand or collapse the ribbon.

Ctrl+F1

Open a context menu.

Shift+F10

Or, on a Windows keyboard

Context key (between the right Alt and right Ctrl keys)

Move to the submenu when a main menu is open or selected.

Left Arrow key

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Excel keyboard shortcut reference

Keyboard shortcuts for navigating in cells

To do this

Press

Move to the previous cell in a worksheet or the previous option in a dialog box.

Shift+Tab

Move one cell up in a worksheet.

Up Arrow key

Move one cell down in a worksheet.

Down Arrow key

Move one cell left in a worksheet.

Left Arrow key

Move one cell right in a worksheet.

Right Arrow key

Move to the edge of the current data region in a worksheet.

Ctrl+arrow key

Enter End mode, move to the next nonblank cell in the same column or row as the active cell, and turn off End mode. If the cells are blank, move to the last cell in the row or column.

End, arrow key

Move to the last cell on a worksheet, to the lowest used row of the rightmost used column.

Ctrl+End

Extend the selection of cells to the last used cell on the worksheet (lower-right corner).

Ctrl+Shift+End

Move to the cell in the upper-left corner of the window when Scroll Lock is turned on.

Home+Scroll Lock

Move to the beginning of a worksheet.

Ctrl+Home

Move one screen down in a worksheet.

Page Down

Move to the next sheet in a workbook.

Ctrl+Page Down

Move one screen to the right in a worksheet.

Alt+Page Down

Move one screen up in a worksheet.

Page Up

Move one screen to the left in a worksheet.

Alt+Page Up

Move to the previous sheet in a workbook.

Ctrl+Page Up

Move one cell to the right in a worksheet. Or, in a protected worksheet, move between unlocked cells.

Tab

Cycle through floating shapes, such as text boxes or images.

Ctrl+Alt+5, and then the Tab key repeatedly

Exit the floating shape navigation and return to the normal navigation.

Esc

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Keyboard shortcuts for formatting cells

To do this

Press

Open the Format Cells dialog box.

Ctrl+1

Format fonts in the Format Cells dialog box.

Ctrl+Shift+F or Ctrl+Shift+P

Edit the active cell and put the insertion point at the end of its contents. Or, if editing is turned off for the cell, move the insertion point into the formula bar. If editing a formula, toggle Point mode off or on so you can use arrow keys to create a reference.

F2

Add or edit a cell comment.

Shift+F2

Open the Insert dialog to insert blank cells.

Ctrl+Shift+Plus (+)

Open the Delete dialog box to delete selected cells.

Ctrl+Minus (-)

Enter the current time.

Ctrl+Shift+colon (:)

Enter the current date.

Ctrl+semi-colon (;)

Switch between displaying cell values or formulas in the worksheet.

Ctrl+grave accent (`)

Copy a formula from the cell above the active cell into the cell or the Formula Bar.

Ctrl+apostrophe (')

Move the selected cells.

Ctrl+X

Copy the selected cells.

Ctrl+C

Paste content at the insertion point, replacing any selection.

Ctrl+V

Open the Paste Special dialog box.

Ctrl+Alt+V

Italicize text or remove italic formatting.

Ctrl+I or Ctrl+3

Bold text or remove bold formatting.

Ctrl+B or Ctrl+2

Underline text or remove underline.

Ctrl+U or Ctrl+4

Apply or remove strikethrough formatting.

Ctrl+5

Switch between hiding objects, displaying objects, and displaying placeholders for objects.

Ctrl+6

Apply an outline border to the selected cells.

Ctrl+Shift+ampersand (&)

Remove the outline border from the selected cells.

Ctrl+Shift+underline (_)

Display or hide the outline symbols.

Ctrl+8

Use the Fill Down command to copy the contents and format of the topmost cell of a selected range into the cells below.

Ctrl+D

Apply the General number format.

Ctrl+Shift+tilde (~)

Apply the Currency format with two decimal places (negative numbers in parentheses).

Ctrl+Shift+dollar sign ($)

Apply the Percentage format with no decimal places.

Ctrl+Shift+percent (%)

Apply the Scientific number format with two decimal places.

Ctrl+Shift+caret (^)

Apply the Date format with the day, month, and year.

Ctrl+Shift+number sign (#)

Apply the Time format with the hour and minute, and AM or PM.

Ctrl+Shift+at sign (@)

Apply the Number format with two decimal places, thousands separator, and minus sign (-) for negative values.

Ctrl+Shift+exclamation point (!)

Open the Insert hyperlink dialog.

Ctrl+K

Check spelling in the active worksheet or selected range.

F7

Display the Quick Analysis options for selected cells that contain data.

Ctrl+Q

Display the Create Table dialog box.

Ctrl+L or Ctrl+T

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Keyboard shortcuts for making selections and performing actions

To do this

Press

Select the entire worksheet.

Ctrl+A or Ctrl+Shift+Spacebar

Select the current and next sheet in a workbook.

Ctrl+Shift+Page Down

Select the current and previous sheet in a workbook.

Ctrl+Shift+Page Up

Extend the selection of cells by one cell.

Shift+arrow key

Extend the selection of cells to the last nonblank cell in the same column or row as the active cell, or if the next cell is blank, to the next nonblank cell.

Ctrl+Shift+arrow key

Turn extend mode on and use the arrow keys to extend a selection. Press again to turn off.

Turn extend mode on and use the arrow keys to extend a selection. Press again to turn off. F8

Add a non-adjacent cell or range to a selection of cells by using the arrow keys.

Shift+F8

Start a new line in the same cell.

Alt+Enter

Fill the selected cell range with the current entry.

Ctrl+Enter

Complete a cell entry and select the cell above.

Shift+Enter

Select an entire column in a worksheet.

Ctrl+Spacebar

Select an entire row in a worksheet.

Shift+Spacebar

Select all objects on a worksheet when an object is selected.

Ctrl+Shift+Spacebar

Extend the selection of cells to the beginning of the worksheet.

Ctrl+Shift+Home

Select the current region if the worksheet contains data. Press a second time to select the current region and its summary rows. Press a third time to select the entire worksheet.

Ctrl+A or Ctrl+Shift+Spacebar

Select the current region around the active cell or select an entire PivotTable report.

Ctrl+Shift+asterisk (*)

Select the first command on the menu when a menu or submenu is visible.

Home

Repeat the last command or action, if possible.

Ctrl+Y

Undo the last action.

Ctrl+Z

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Keyboard shortcuts for working with data, functions, and the formula bar

To do this

Press

Select an entire PivotTable report.

Ctrl+Shift+asterisk (*)

Edit the active cell and put the insertion point at the end of its contents. Or, if editing is turned off for the cell, move the insertion point into the formula bar. If editing a formula, toggle Point mode off or on so you can use arrow keys to create a reference.

F2

Expand or collapse the formula bar.

Ctrl+Shift+U

Cancel an entry in the cell or Formula Bar.

Esc

Complete an entry in the formula bar and select the cell below.

Enter

Move the cursor to the end of the text when in the formula bar.

Ctrl+End

Select all text in the formula bar from the cursor position to the end.

Ctrl+Shift+End

Calculate all worksheets in all open workbooks.

F9

Calculate the active worksheet.

Shift+F9

Calculate all worksheets in all open workbooks, regardless of whether they have changed since the last calculation.

Ctrl+Alt+F9

Check dependent formulas, and then calculate all cells in all open workbooks, including cells not marked as needing to be calculated.

Ctrl+Alt+Shift+F9

Display the menu or message for an Error Checking button.

Alt+Shift+F10

Display the Function Arguments dialog box when the insertion point is to the right of a function name in a formula.

Ctrl+A

Insert argument names and parentheses when the insertion point is to the right of a function name in a formula.

Ctrl+Shift+A

Invoke Flash Fill to automatically recognize patterns in adjacent columns and fill the current column

Ctrl+E

Cycle through all combinations of absolute and relative references in a formula if a cell reference or range is selected.

F4

Insert a function.

Shift+F3

Copy the value from the cell above the active cell into the cell or the formula bar.

Ctrl+Shift+straight quotation mark (")

Create an embedded chart of the data in the current range.

Alt+F1

Create a chart of the data in the current range in a separate Chart sheet.

F11

Define a name to use in references.

Alt+M, M, D

Paste a name from the Paste Name dialog box (if names have been defined in the workbook.

F3

Move to the first field in the next record of a data form.

Enter

Create, run, edit, or delete a macro.

Alt+F8

Open the Microsoft Visual Basic For Applications Editor.

Alt+F11

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Function keys

Key

Description

F1

  • F1 alone: displays the Excel Help task pane.

  • Ctrl+F1: displays or hides the ribbon.

  • Alt+F1: creates an embedded chart of the data in the current range.

  • Alt+Shift+F1: inserts a new worksheet.

F2

  • F2 alone: edit the active cell and put the insertion point at the end of its contents. Or, if editing is turned off for the cell, move the insertion point into the formula bar. If editing a formula, toggle Point mode off or on so you can use arrow keys to create a reference.

  • Shift+F2: adds or edits a cell comment.

  • Ctrl+F2: displays the print preview area on the Print tab in the Backstage view.

F3

  • F3 alone: displays the Paste Name dialog box. Available only if names have been defined in the workbook.

  • Shift+F3: displays the Insert Function dialog box.

F4

  • F4 alone: repeats the last command or action, if possible.

    When a cell reference or range is selected in a formula, F4 cycles through all the various combinations of absolute and relative references.

  • Ctrl+F4: closes the selected workbook window.

  • Alt+F4: closes Excel.

F5

  • F5 alone: displays the Go To dialog box.

  • Ctrl+F5: restores the window size of the selected workbook window.

F6

  • F6 alone: switches between the worksheet, ribbon, task pane, and Zoom controls. In a worksheet that has been split , F6 includes the split panes when switching between panes and the ribbon area.

  • Shift+F6: switches between the worksheet, Zoom controls, task pane, and ribbon.

  • Ctrl+F6: switches to the next workbook window when more than one workbook window is open.

F7

  • F7 alone: Opens the Spelling dialog box to check spelling in the active worksheet or selected range.

  • Ctrl+F7: performs the Move command on the workbook window when it is not maximized. Use the arrow keys to move the window, and when finished press Enter, or Esc to cancel.

  • F8 alone: turns extend mode on or off. In extend mode, Extended Selection appears in the status line, and the arrow keys extend the selection.

F8

  • Shift+F8: enables you to add a nonadjacent cell or range to a selection of cells by using the arrow keys.

  • Ctrl+F8: performs the Size command when a workbook is not maximized.

  • Alt+F8: displays the Macro dialog box to create, run, edit, or delete a macro.

F9

  • F9 alone: calculates all worksheets in all open workbooks.

  • Shift+F9: calculates the active worksheet.

  • Ctrl+Alt+F9: calculates all worksheets in all open workbooks, regardless of whether they have changed since the last calculation.

  • Ctrl+Alt+Shift+F9: rechecks dependent formulas, and then calculates all cells in all open workbooks, including cells not marked as needing to be calculated.

  • Ctrl+F9: minimizes a workbook window to an icon.

F10

  • F10 alone: Turns key tips on or off. (Pressing Alt does the same thing.)

  • Shift+F10: displays the shortcut menu for a selected item.

  • Alt+Shift+F10: displays the menu or message for an Error Checking button.

  • Ctrl+F10: maximizes or restores the selected workbook window.

F11

  • F11 alone: Creates a chart of the data in the current range in a separate Chart sheet.

  • Shift+F11: inserts a new worksheet.

  • Alt+F11: opens the Microsoft Visual Basic For Applications Editor, in which you can create a macro by using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA).

F12

  • F12 alone: displays the Save As dialog box.

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Other useful shortcut keys

Key

Description

Alt

  • Displays the Key Tips (new shortcuts) on the ribbon.

For example,

  • Alt, W, P switches the worksheet to Page Layout view.

  • Alt, W, L switches the worksheet to Normal view.

  • Alt, W, I switches the worksheet to Page Break Preview view.

Arrow Keys

  • Move one cell up, down, left, or right in a worksheet.

  • Ctrl+Arrow Key moves to the edge of the current data region in a worksheet.

  • Shift+Arrow Key extends the selection of cells by one cell.

  • Ctrl+Shift+Arrow Key extends the selection of cells to the last nonblank cell in the same column or row as the active cell, or if the next cell is blank, extends the selection to the next nonblank cell.

  • Left Arrow or Right Arrow selects the tab to the left or right when the ribbon is selected. When a submenu is open or selected, these arrow keys switch between the main menu and the submenu. When a ribbon tab is selected, these keys navigate the tab buttons.

  • Down Arrow or Up Arrow selects the next or previous command when a menu or submenu is open. When a ribbon tab is selected, these keys navigate up or down the tab group.

  • In a dialog box, arrow keys move between options in an open drop-down list, or between options in a group of options.

  • Down Arrow or Alt+Down Arrow opens a selected drop-down list.

Backspace

  • Deletes one character to the left in the Formula Bar.

  • Also clears the content of the active cell.

  • In cell editing mode, it deletes the character to the left of the insertion point.

Delete

  • Removes the cell contents (data and formulas) from selected cells without affecting cell formats or comments.

  • In cell editing mode, it deletes the character to the right of the insertion point.

End

  • End turns End mode on or off. In End mode, you can press an arrow key to move to the next nonblank cell in the same column or row as the active cell. End mode turns off automatically after pressing the arrow key. Make sure to press End again before pressing the next arrow key. End mode is shown in the status bar when it is on.

  • If the cells are blank, pressing End followed by an arrow key moves to the last cell in the row or column.

  • End also selects the last command on the menu when a menu or submenu is visible.

  • Ctrl+End moves to the last cell on a worksheet, to the lowest used row of the rightmost used column. If the cursor is in the formula bar, Ctrl+End moves the cursor to the end of the text.

  • Ctrl+Shift+End extends the selection of cells to the last used cell on the worksheet (lower-right corner). If the cursor is in the formula bar, Ctrl+Shift+End selects all text in the formula bar from the cursor position to the end—this does not affect the height of the formula bar.

Enter

  • Completes a cell entry from the cell or the Formula Bar, and selects the cell below (by default).

  • In a data form, it moves to the first field in the next record.

  • Opens a selected menu (press F10 to activate the menu bar) or performs the action for a selected command.

  • In a dialog box, it performs the action for the default command button in the dialog box (the button with the bold outline, often the OK button).

  • Alt+Enter starts a new line in the same cell.

  • Ctrl+Enter fills the selected cell range with the current entry.

  • Shift+Enter completes a cell entry and selects the cell above.

Esc

  • Cancels an entry in the cell or Formula Bar.

  • Closes an open menu or submenu, dialog box, or message window.

  • It also closes full screen mode when this mode has been applied, and returns to normal screen mode to display the ribbon and status bar again.

Home

  • Moves to the beginning of a row in a worksheet.

  • Moves to the cell in the upper-left corner of the window when Scroll Lock is turned on.

  • Selects the first command on the menu when a menu or submenu is visible.

  • Ctrl+Home moves to the beginning of a worksheet.

  • Ctrl+Shift+Home extends the selection of cells to the beginning of the worksheet.

Page Down

  • Moves one screen down in a worksheet.

  • Alt+Page Down moves one screen to the right in a worksheet.

  • Ctrl+Page Down moves to the next sheet in a workbook.

  • Ctrl+Shift+Page Down selects the current and next sheet in a workbook.

Page Up

  • Moves one screen up in a worksheet.

  • Alt+Page Up moves one screen to the left in a worksheet.

  • Ctrl+Page Up moves to the previous sheet in a workbook.

  • Ctrl+Shift+Page Up selects the current and previous sheet in a workbook.

Spacebar

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